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Use phrasing such as this: Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation, commonly known as APEC, ...

Question from Hackensack , NJ on Sept. 20, 2019

Is writing a monetary range as "$20,000 to $30,000" correct? 

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Yes, that's correct.

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My initial thought was to say it's an adverb, with no hyphen: The walk-in baggage compartment remains accessible in flight. But when I read what I just wrote, I get a vision of the baggage compartment happily flying off (but still accessible). So to avoid amusing other readers with over-active imaginations, I'd use the hyphen: The walk-in baggage compartment remains accessible in-flight.  (I still can't shake that vision, though.) Or: The walk-in baggage compartment remains accessible during flight.

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Spell it out, following this guidance:

IN INDEFINITE AND CASUAL USES: Thanks a million. He walked a quarter of a mile. One at a time; a thousand clowns; one day we will know; an eleventh-hour decision; dollar store; a hundred dollars.


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No hyphen.

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The period always goes inside the quotation marks, even if it's not a direct quote.

PLACEMENT WITH OTHER PUNCTUATION: Follow these long-established printers' rules:
The period and the comma always go within the quotation marks.
The dash, the semicolon, the colon, the question mark and the exclamation point go within the quotation marks when they apply to the quoted matter only. They go outside when they apply to the whole sentence.


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AP style doesn't use either italics or underlining for anything. The Stylebook and this forum use italics to show usage. But the style itself is to write a newspaper name just as you have it.

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Any time you think it might be better to break a long, punctuation-heavy sentence into two, you probably are right! The original version uses the first comma improperly and is too long. I'd do two sentences. Or, your proposal of using a colon after app also would work.

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It's not our style. But you could make a case for it. Consider the audience for this piece. Would those readers understand the shorthand on first reference? Then it's probably fine. (Not our style, but ...) Still, if you do use the abbreviation on first reference, I'd recommend spelling both out at some point (and presumably explaining the loans).


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.... equipment is considered dangerous ... (I hope you win!)

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We don't have a style for that. I'd prefer to use the full number (it's just one more digit than your second example) but that's just me.

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Vagaries of the English language? We follow the style of our official dictionary, Webster's New World College Dictionary, which shows teenage and middle-aged as the adjectives. Merriam-Webster, which is a separate entity, has the same style.


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I'd use the uppercase as part of a formal designation.


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We would call it the agency or the community service agency on second reference.

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Yes, that needs hyphens. FYI, our style is to use numerals for ages: 5-year-old.

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I'd use best interests. Presumably even one resident has more than one best interest (for example, cleanliness and safety). 

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We changed our style this year to use the % sign in most cases. Here's the entry:


percent, percentage, percentage points 


Use the % sign when paired with a numeral, with no space, in most cases (a change in 2019): Average hourly pay rose 3.1% from a year ago; her mortgage rate is 4.75%; about 60% of Americans agreed; he won 56.2% of the vote. Use figures: 1%, 4 percentage points.
For amounts less than 1%, precede the decimal with a zero: The cost of living rose 0.6%.
In casual uses, use words rather than figures and numbers: She said he has a zero percent chance of winning.
At the start of a sentence: Try to avoid this construction. If it’s necessary to start a sentence with a percentage, spell out both: Eighty-nine percent of sentences don’t have to begin with a number.
Constructions with the % sign take a singular verb when standing alone or when a singular word follows an of construction: The teacher said 60% was a failing grade. He said 50% of the membership was there.
It takes a plural verb when a plural word follows an of construction: He said 50% of the members were there.
Use decimals, not fractions, in percentages: Her mortgage rate is 4.5%.
For a range, 12% to 15%, 12%-15% and between 12% and 15% are all acceptable.
Use percentage, rather than percent, when not paired with a number: The percentage of people agreeing is small.
Be careful not to confuse percent with percentage point. A change from 10% to 13% is a rise of 3 percentage points. This is not equal to a 3% change; rather, it’s a 30% increase.
Usage: Republicans passed a 0.25 percentage point tax cut. Not: Republicans passed a 0.25 percentage points tax cut or Republicans passed a tax cut of 0.25 of a percentage point.



Question from COLUMBIA, MO on Sept. 18, 2019

Should it be FOX Sports or Fox Sports and why? 
Thanks! 

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Our style is Fox Sports, in keeping with this part of the company names entry:

Do not use all-capital-letter names unless the letters are individually pronounced: BMW. Others should be uppercase and lowercase. Ikea, not IKEA; USA Today, not USA TODAY.

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Yes, that should be hyphenated.

Here's the relevant part of the hyphen entry:

Generally, also use a hyphen in modifiers of three or more words: a know-it-all attitude, black-and-white photography, a sink-or-swim moment, a win-at-all-costs approach. Consider carefully, though, before deciding to use more than three modifiers.


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There may be nuances of horse varieties that are well beyond my expertise. But, generally speaking, I'd go with long-eared. Webster's New World College Dictionary doesn't have a listing for the horse, but it does refer to a long-eared deer and I'd think the same style would work for a horse:

mule deer  a long-eared deer (Odocoileus hemionus) of the W U.S. & Canada with a black tail


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That's in keeping with our existing guidance:


they, them, their 


In most cases, a plural pronoun should agree in number with the antecedent: The children love the books their uncle gave them. They/them/their is acceptable in limited cases as a singular and/or gender-neutral pronoun, when alternative wording is overly awkward or clumsy. However, rewording usually is possible and always is preferable. Clarity is a top priority; gender-neutral use of a singular they is unfamiliar to many readers. We do not use other gender-neutral pronouns such as xe or ze.
Usage example: A singular they might be used when an anonymous source's gender must be shielded and other wording is overly awkward: The person feared for their own safety and spoke on condition of anonymity.
Arguments for using they/them as a singular sometimes arise with an indefinite pronoun (anyone, everyone, someone) or unspecified/unknown gender (a person, the victim, the winner). Examples of rewording:
All the class members raised their hands (instead of everyone raised their hands).
The foundation gave grants to anyone who lost a job this year (instead of anyone who lost their job).
Police said the victim would be identified after relatives are notified (instead of after their relatives are notified or after his or her relatives are notified).
Lottery officials said the winner could claim the prize Tuesday (instead of their or hisor her prize).
In stories about people who identify as neither male nor female or ask not to be referred to as he/she/him/her: Use the person's name in place of a pronoun, or otherwise reword the sentence, whenever possible. If they/them/their use is essential, explain in the text that the person prefers a gender-neutral pronoun. Be sure that the phrasing does not imply more than one person. Examples of rewording:
Hendricks said the new job is a thrill (instead of Hendricks said Hendricks is thrilled about the new job or Hendricks said they are thrilled about the new job).
Lowry's partner is Dana Adams, an antiques dealer. They bought a house last year(instead of Lowry and Lowry's partner bought a house last year or Lowry and their partner bought a house last year).
When they is used in the singular, it takes a plural verb: Taylor said they need a new car. (Again, be sure it's clear from the context that only one person is involved.)
The singular reflexive themself is acceptable only if needed in constructions involving people who identify as neither male nor female. Again, it’s usually possible and always best to rephrase. Dana Adams was not available for comment yet (instead of Dana Adams did not make themself available for comment).



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We don't capitalize a season in that use; only if it's part of a formal name. 

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... born in Kiev, Ukraine, when it was a part of the Russian empire. The city is now known as Kyiv, the capital of independent Ukraine. 

Question from Maitland, FL on Sept. 17, 2019

Would it be inpatient services or in-patient services?

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It's inpatient, according to Webster's New World College dictionary.

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There's no good way to do it. A comma or dash just makes it more confusing, I think. An ellipsis can indicate a pause. In theory that might work, but it also can indicate deleted material. So that, too, is confusing. I'd go with no punctuation at all, as you have it written. An imperfect solution, but I think it's the best one.


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From the Pronunciation Guide

Kyiv

KEE'-yeev

Capital of Ukraine (new spelling and pronunciation)

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Hurricanes Topical Guide The Associated Press compiled a style guide of essential words, phrases and definitions related to the storm. Terms are from the AP Stylebook and usage in AP stories. This...


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