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Last Seven Days

Question from Westerville, OH on Oct. 17, 2018

Your thoughts: three decades worth or three decades' worth?

Answer

It's three decades' worth, per this sections of the possessives entry:


QUASI POSSESSIVES: Follow the rules above in composing the possessive form of words that occur in such phrases as a day's pay, two weeks' vacation, three days' work, your money's worth.
Frequently, however, a hyphenated form is clearer: a two-week vacation, a three-day job.


Answer

I'd say that's better than trying to come up with the numeric version!


Answer

No need for hyphens there.


Question from on Oct. 16, 2018

"sports events" or "sporting events"

Answer

Either is fine.


Answer

AP style doesn't capitalize that.


Answer

It's 10 to 15 years. Under 10, it's one to five years.



Question from Louisville, KY on Oct. 16, 2018

Does the AP Stylebook have an official stance on the need + V-en form of speech, also known as "needs washed"? The Yale Grammatical Diversity Project has a thorough article on the subject, however I have not found any mention of it in the AP Stylebook. Thanks!

Answer

The Stylebook itself doesn't address the question. AP stories would not use constructions such as the car needs washed or the Stylebook needs read.

Answer

We say about 19 cents.

Answer

We'd make it lake-view apartment homes.



Answer

It's OK either with or without the comma. Adding the comma puts more emphasis on each individual element. But it's not necessary.

Answer

There's not a black-and-white answer. It depends on the context. Typically, though, we use said in quoting from a document that has something of a news peg or time peg: The FBI said in a report two months ago;  the company's SEC filings said Thursday. The present tense says conveys a more timeless sense, which may be appropriate in some uses: The  company's bylaws say, the school's security report says ...


Answer

We intend for the rule to apply to all proper nouns, not just names of people. Just as there is (probably) no one named John Smith Monday, there is no entity called the Atlanta Airport Tuesday , the Newport Jazz Festival Saturday or the AP Stylebook Thursday.



Answer

You've rewritten it perfectly (if, indeed, the meaning of 0 is "newborn" in these sentences).  Maybe substitute infants for newborns?

Indeed, 0-5 doesn't work. What mother says: My baby is 0 today!


Answer

AP style continues to use health care, two words. We differ from the dictionary; you can choose whether to use AP style or the dictionary's preference.

Answer

Just capitalize it. 


Answer

You're correct that the introductory clause doesn't agree with the subject, so the sentence is problematic as written. Adding "for everything" solves the grammatical part of the problem. But you still have two issues. One: "For everything" is an overly broad term (often used, but that doesn't make it a good thing). Does Acme Hospital handle obscure cancers, for example? If not, "for everything" is wrong. Two: The clause is overly long and hard to wade through, and it delays getting to the main action. I'd recommend rephrasing it. Something like:

Robotic surgeries. A state-of-the-art emergency room. Comfortable private rooms and maternity suites. Those are just a few of the reasons more people are choosing Acme Hospital.

or

For so many reasons, more people are choosing Acme Hospital: robotic surgeries, a state-of-the-art emergency room, comfortable private rooms and maternity suites, and more.


Answer

We typically use a link shortener to avoid these problems. 


Question from Lapeer, MI on Oct. 15, 2018

Is it pizzaria or pizzeria?

Answer

From our official dictionary (Webster's New World College Dictionary):

pizzeria  n. [[It < pizza, pizza + -eria, -ery]] a place where pizzas are prepared and sold 

pizzaria  n. disputed sp. of pizzeria 


Answer

No, those are both lowercase in those uses. 


Answer

This is correct: Use no period at the end of a subhead, but do use a period at the end of each item in a bulleted list. 

You also surmise correctly that question marks are treated differently. We use a question mark (when it's the appropriate punctuation, of course!) at the end of both subheads and bulleted lists. However, if you use one question mark at the end of an item in a bulleted list, then use the same structure for each item and end each with a question mark.

We are discussing:

  • What is the difference between a period and a question mark as far as subheads and bulleted lists are concerned?
  • Is it OK to end a subhead with a period? How about with a question mark?
  • Is it sometimes OK to end an item in a bulleted list with a question mark.?
  • This last item in this list is not correctly structured; it needs to be a question to keep the structure of each item parallel.





Answer

Yes, although typically AP doesn't use the formal name of a channel. We'd say the AP Stylebook's YouTube channel.


Answer

Second reference would be de la Vergne said. But if it leads a sentence, De would be capitalized.

Answer

For any ranking, use numerals. So it's top 5.

Answer

We'd probably try to avoid using it twice. We might write something like over two months in 2018, from May to June.

Answer

Yes, if you're certain that the reader will know that you're talking about the same group. But we would not capitalize veterans.

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