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Answer

We don't capitalize city at all in such a use. Our style is: The city of Albuquerque chose ... Or better, Albuquerque city officials chose ...

Of course, you can do otherwise if you prefer. That includes what to do on second reference. We would use lowercase. You might prefer to use uppercase.


Answer

I'd hyphenate it.

Answer

We lowercase it.


Question from Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, on April 19, 2021

Is it autoreply, or auto reply? 

Answer

Autoreply.

Question from Chicago, Illinois, on April 19, 2021

How should I punctuate an unpublished book title that is tentative?

Answer

The book, tentatively titled "My Unpublished Book," is expected next year.

Answer

We don't start sentences with symbols. I'd rephrase to avoid. Also, we don't use platform as a verb. And we capitalize Indigenous.

Question from Cary, North Carolina, on April 17, 2021

Are minors referred to by first name or last name on second reference?

Answer

Generally by their first name, but circumstances can dictate otherwise. See this entry:

names 


In general, use only last names on second reference. When it is necessary to distinguish between two people who use the same last name, generally use the first and last name on subsequent references. Generally use the name a person prefers: Thomas or Tom, depending on preference; Martine McCarthy Chang may prefer McCarthy Chang or Chang on second reference. If an individual requests it, a public name rather than a real name may be used for a political dissident, or a nom de guerre for a rebel leader, if the person's safety is an issue. In general, call children 15 or younger by their first name on second reference. Use the last name, however, if the seriousness of the story calls for it, as in a murder case, for example. For ages 16 and 17, use judgment, but generally go with the surname unless it's a light story. Use the surname for those 18 and older

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Question from Jacksonville, Florida, on April 17, 2021

Is it "a" or "an" $800,000 deal? (Or any 8 reference, for that matter.)

Answer

An ...

Answer

We don't use quotation marks.

Answer

We say the person creates videos for TikTok. You might use more informal phrasing if you prefer.

Answer

We retain our style for general readers. You may choose a different style for more specific audiences.

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Here's the entry. See the last example.

plus symbol (+) 


The symbol is acceptable when it is pronounced as part of a company, brand or event name: Disney+, Apple TV+, ESPN+, CompTia Network+. Do not use in slugs of AP stories; use plus in slugs. Use the word plus in other uses: They expect 200-plus people. He is my plus-one. Flowers plus blue skies make for a nice day. She got a B-plus on the test.

Answer

Yes, use the comma after the year in your example.

Answer

Our style is Ameribor.

Answer

Debuts, in that usage.

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Yes on the hyphen. But to quibble: The establishment itself doesn't handle food.

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Either is fine.

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We use AOC only in direct quotations.

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Option 2 is definitely how we would do it: Students are required to take a three-credit-hour elective.

Answer

Yes, you need the neral as part of the book name.

If possible, I'd look for a way to avoid starting the sentence with a numeral. Maybe a transition, such as The concern is that 2 Kings 19:37 ... or whatever phrasing is appropriate in the context.

If you can't do that, I'd consider this to be one of the exceptions allowing sentences to begin with a numeral, rather than the spelled-out version of the number. The general guidance, and other exceptions, are in this section of the numerals entry:

AT THE START OF A SENTENCE: In general, spell out numbers at the start of a sentence: Forty years was a long time to wait. Fifteen to 20 cars were involved in the accident. An exception is years: 1992 was a very good year. Another exception: Numeral(s) and letter(s) combinations: 401(k) plans are offered. 4K TVs are flying off the shelves. 3D movies are drawing more fans.


Answer

We don't have specific guidance on that. My instinct, as a regular reader and as an editor, is that readers assume the period includes the dates given. That is, that the program started on April 1, 2020, and ends on Jan. 31, 2021. 

Otherwise, poor readers would have to do mental calculations about when it actually starts and ends. And no one does that in real life, as far as I know. 

Question from Omaha, Nebraska, on April 14, 2021

What is preferred "programing" or "programming"?

Answer

Programming.

Question from farmington, Maine, on April 14, 2021

Would AP cap Critical Race Theory?

Answer

No caps. And explain what it is, of course.

Answer

Consider your audience: Can you tell whether many/most/all of your readers are likely to be strict grammarians, or more flexible? Consider the style of writing: formal or informal?

There are many arguments these days for doing away with whom in many, most or maybe even all cases. They argue that writing whom in a sentence like your example is the equivalent of throwing a roadblock into that sentence and sending readers running away. Others find the idea of abandoning whom abhorrent and a signal of the decline of civilization.

My view is that it's fine to bend the rule if doing so makes sense for your audience and your particular piece of writing. 



Answer

She graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a bachelor's degree in American history and English literature from the University of Chicago.

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