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Last Seven Days

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The 2017 and 2011 answers are outdated. I'll delete them. Thanks for pointing them out!

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Walk Where You Are Facebook group

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The Stylebook's preferred dictionary, Webster's New World College Dictionary, doesn't recognize catfish or catfishing in the context you're talking about. But Merriam-Webster does. For catfish as a noun:  "a person who sets up a false personal profile on a social networking site for fraudulent or deceptive purposes."

There's a strong chance that the term isn't understood in this context by many readers. I'd use quote marks, and explain what it means.


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There's no absolute rule. In your example, I'd go with .... uppercase and lowercase letters.

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Use quote marks and explain the term immediately. I don't know how a hyphen or hyphens would be involved.

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Our guidance on that point has been the same for years and hasn't changed, despite what you may read on Twitter. Here it is:

fewer, less 


In general, use fewer for individual items, less for bulk or quantity.
Wrong: The trend is toward more machines and less people. (People in this sense refers to individuals.)
Wrong: She was fewer than 60 years old. (Years in this sense refers to a period of time, not individual years.)
Right: Fewer than 10 applicants called. (Individuals.)
Right: I had less than $50 in my pocket. (An amount.) But: I had fewer than 50 $1 bills in my pocket.(Individual items.)


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I think it's fine with no quote marks.

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The guidance on the plural remains the same: If an organization's preference is spokesperson, the plural would be spokespersons. Otherwise, spokespeople probably is better.

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We recommend rewriting as you indicate. Common usage often allows the sentence as originally written, though.


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We're sticking with one word. You can use two if you prefer.

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Yes. We are capitalizing Black in all usages involving race.

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It is odd, and we'd probably avoid it. So many expenditures involve thousands of dollars -- cars, tuition, vacations. Multithousand would be a pretty useless modifier.

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Webster's New World does not offer up education as a modifier. We'd stick with educational.

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In most usages we can find, there's no hyphen. So: inline.

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Yes, we.

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It should be two touchdowns and six rebounds. The statistical reference is to box scores, line scores, etc.

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I think it would depend on the usage. It's not typically used in the plural. I suspect you'd be better off rewriting to avoid the issue.

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They are interchangeable.

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According to the stylebook, media "generally take a plural verb, especially when the reference is to individual outlets ... Sometimes used with a singular verb when referring to media as a monolithic group." The latter is clearly the case when you're talking about "the mainstream media." 

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This is not necessarily a usage limited to rape: The man was murdered, the couple were robbed. If the focus is on the victim, there's no issue.

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It's fine as written.

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We don't use the term.

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No need for the comma there.

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Yes. According to our style, we do not use the term "murder" until someone has been convicted in court, using "death" or "killing" instead.

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It's best not to use that construction, because it indicates a false range. What is "everything" between sick leave and vacation policies? How are sick leave and vacation policies at the opposite ends of a range?

Instead: Our analysts can answer questions on a wide variety of topics. Just a few examples: sick leave, vacation policies, required workplace notices, termination policies.


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Coronavirus Topical Guide

To help with coverage of the coronavirus and COVID-19, The Associated Press has prepared a guide based on the AP Stylebook and common usage in AP stories. For more details, follow AP coverage of...


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