Ask the Editor

Last Seven Days

Answer

No need to include the .com unless it's in the proper name of the publication. You're citing a publication, not its URL.

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Our guidance in suffixes advises no hyphen in commonly used words such as concertgoer, filmgoer, moviegoer, theatergoer. Parkgoer and paradegoer are not common, so I might include a hyphen in those. Or say something less awkward like park visitor or parade watcher or parade participant.

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Yes, I'd hyphenate master-plan as a verb. See our guidance on compound verbs in hyphen.

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MLB is acceptable on first reference. See our guidance in abbreviations.

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AP doesn't have any specific guidance on the terms working mom or working mother, though arguments against it have merit. You could say something like Mothers who work outside the home as an alternative. A search does turn up several AP stories that mention working dads or fathers.

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As do I.

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Hello! This is Jeff, filling in for Paula. The verb applies only to the first subject, not the parenthetical subject, so it should be equips.

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First, thank you for being sensitive to our guidance in disabilities to avoid using disability-related words lightly or in unrelated situations.

Merriam-Webster does contain this definition of blind: to intentionally prevent (someone, such as a researcher or study participant) from seeing certain objects or knowing certain facts that could bias, influence, or interfere with the outcome or results of a research study, clinical trial, etc. Further, our Health and Science coverage guidelines contain a reference to double blind

So since you're neither using the terms lightly nor in unrelated situations, I'd say you're safe to go ahead and use them at least in an initial reference. But this is a good thing to add to our discussion list, so thank you for raising it!

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I'd go with plain text STYLE (or whichever case is being instructed) to avoid confusion over whether people should include punctuation or formatting in the text message they're sending.

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For trade names, apply the guidance in company names to always capitalize them at the beginning of a sentence.

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I'd capitalize Western when referring to styles of dress, applying the logic from our guidance to capitalize Western swing music and to capitalize most proper adjectives in foods.

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Good day! We still advise: Do not follow an organization’s full name with an abbreviation or acronym in parentheses or set off by dashes. If an abbreviation or acronym would not be clear on second reference without this arrangement, do not use it.

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Hello, this is Jeff, filling in for Paula. Yes, it would make sense in these examples to follow our guidance under numerals on sequential designations.

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We don't address salutations in our guidance, but to answer your question, I'd lowercase the subject unless it's a proper noun: Dear team, but Dear Trixie.

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Yes, and also abbreviate before a name: Gens. Nathanael Greene and Henry Knox. See our guidance in military titles.

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Yes.

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I'd lowercase those unless the names of the features themselves are a proper noun: the downloads folder. But OneDrive.

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You may be looking at outdated guidance. Our current guidance on animals says: Do not apply a personal pronoun to an animal unless its sex has been established or the animal has a name.

Question from New York City, New York, on June 18, 2024

How should the police department in New York City be identified? 

Answer

AP stories generally refer to it as the New York Police Department on first reference and as the NYPD thereafter.

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Hi, this is Jeff, covering for Paula. You might find what you're looking for in the entry currency conversions. If you need to distinguish US dollars, then say 1 million US dollars on first reference and US$1 million on subsequent references.

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The introductory clause After lunch along the waterfront does not modify the rest of the sentence, so neither example is a dangling modifier.

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Lowercase agency in this instance.

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Other writers and editors might make different choices, but I'd put a comma after marketing in the first example. A comma after integrates in the second example could aid comprehension, but I don't find the sentence terribly problematic as is.

Answer

Good question! I'd probably go with Point A to Point B to be consistent with our guidance on sequential designations and with this answer to a previous Ask the Editor question about food grades.

Answer

Merriam-Webster goes with bristlelike, which also follows the AP's guidelines on -like in suffixes.

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