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Last Seven Days

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Webster's New World College Dictionary uses the hyphen: speak-easy, speak-easies.

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 ... on Long Island.

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PSA is OK on second reference and in headlines. I've deleted the 2014 answer.

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As you have it. From the plurals entry:

MULTIPLE LETTERS: Add s: She knows her ABCs. I gave him five IOUs. Four VIPs were there.


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Personal style choice.

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Thank you for the fan mail! 

We changed our style several years ago to spell out the state name in most uses. So that part is correct. However, we were missing the second comma, after the state name, in these automated date and location tags. We've now fixed that. Thanks!


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Those is correct, if you're referring to more than one.

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I'd use the hyphen. 


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We would use lowercase.

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Yes, that's fine. Our style would lowercase sports curator following the name (and most likely before the name as well. Note our style on Dr.: 

doctor 


Use Dr. in first reference as a formal title before the name of an individual who holds a doctor of dental surgery, doctor of medicine, doctor of optometry, doctor of osteopathic medicine, doctor of podiatric medicine, or doctor of veterinary medicine: Dr. Jonas Salk.
The form Dr., or Drs. in a plural construction, applies to all first-reference uses before a name, including direct quotations. Do not continue the use of Dr. in subsequent references.
Do not use Dr. before the names of individuals who hold other types of doctoral degrees. Instead, when necessary or appropriate for a specific audience: Cassandra Karoub, who has a doctorate in mathematics, was lead researcher. In a list: Stephanie D’Ercole, Ph.D.


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Five-year prison sentence.

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Grammatically, is. A stream ... is. You might say that sounds odd, and I'd agree. Can you rephrase? Perhaps Teams are leaving the league in a steady stream ... or team after team is leaving the league ...


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We use lowercase with a year.

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The first in an email covers it. We use the past tense in such uses, though:  ... said in an email. And given the email situation, we'd use the past tense on later references as well.

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On the first question: You can repeat the same description in following years without quote marks or attribution to the previous article.

On the second question: I'd use the quote marks for the descripition.

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Yes, the commas are necessary. Also, AP style is 10, not ten.


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If we used the terms, we'd style them as you have it in those examples.

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A complete sentence wouldn't follow a semicolon. So, no, that rule doesn't apply because the situation doesn't exist, or shouldn't exist.

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We use the article in such uses.

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Assuming your audience is familiar with the term, no hyphen is needed.

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... from the week of Feb. 17 through the week of May xx.

We don't define when a week ends; follow the custom of the organization in question.


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Either is fine.

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Here's the entry:

ratios 


Use figures and hyphens: the ratio was 2-to-1, a ratio of 2-to-1, a 2-1 ratio, 1 in 4 voters. As illustrated, the word to should be omitted when the numbers precede the word ratio. Always use the word ratio or a phrase such as a 2-1 majority to avoid confusion with actual figures.


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Either prisoners revolt or prisoner revolt is fine.

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Reopenings genereally isn't recoganized as a noun, though it's used that way casually.  I'd stick with reopening schools.

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Kyiv

KEE'-yeev

Capital of Ukraine (new spelling and pronunciation)
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From the Topical Guides

2020 Elections Topical Guide

A style guide for the 2020 elections, based on the AP Stylebook and common usage in AP stories: voting The 2020 general election is expected to be the first general election in U.S. history in...


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