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Last Seven Days

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Yes, but we prefer not using the form at all. Why not just concerns (or whatever) related to COVID-19.

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No, we wouldn't do that.

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Yes, that's correct.

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This gets into a complicated consideration of coordinate vs. cumulative adjectives. Some examples are more clear-cut than others. I think yours could be read either of the two ways you describe. I would go with Option 2, viewing new customer card options as a single thing, modified by exciting

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Yes, it is a proper noun, assuming you're talking about the actual Zoom platform.

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Yes, I'd use the hyphens. I'll delete the previous answer. Thanks for noting it. 

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I'm not seeing a directive in the 2016 answer to use it only in direct quotes. It says it's often used in direct quotes, and sort of dodges the question of whether it's OK in general use:

In idiomatic speech, eat healthy is widely used, as shown in numerous direct quotes in AP stories. In formal writing outside a direct quote, eat healthy foods preserves the adjective form, as does healthy eating. No hyphen in healthy eating program.

At any rate, I think the phrase eat healthy is so commonly used that indeed, it would sound stodgy and even unhealthy to write eat healthily. Or avoid the issue by rewriting, as noted in the 2016 answer.


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Yes, the same applies to bayous. Lowercase.

Question from Knoxville, TN on April 01, 2020

'safer-at-home' order or 'safer at home' order?

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We'd use the hyphens.

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I'd definitely write around it. Or: coronavirus-related furloughs.

Otherwise: COVID-19-related furloughs. But that's not a good option.


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No, it's lowercase.

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The 1980s' best moment ...

But I'd rephrase: The best moment in the 1980s was ... (This of course assumes that you, or anyone, can judge the best moment of a 10-year span.)


DATES, YEARS AND DECADES: Feb. 8, 2007, Class of '66, the 1950s. For the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, 9/11 is acceptable in all references. (Note comma to set off the year when the phrase refers to a month, date and year.)


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Yes, I'd go with your approach.

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The next five to 10 years.


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I'd use the hyphen in both cases.  

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It's a one-on-one meeting.

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You have it correct. Here's the example from the quotation marks entry:

Use three marks together if two quoted elements end at the same time: She said, "He told me, 'I love you.'"

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There's no specific rule. I'd just use common sense. Do most people know Elvis Presley is dead? Then no need to add "the late." If someone could be mistaken as being among the living, then spell it out.

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I'd use the singular in that case.

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From the Pronunciation Guide

Kyiv

KEE'-yeev

Capital of Ukraine (new spelling and pronunciation)

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From the Topical Guides

Coronavirus Topical Guide

To help with coverage of the new coronavirus disease, called COVID-19, The Associated Press has prepared a guide based on the AP Stylebook and common usage in AP stories. For more details, follow...


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