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Last Seven Days

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No hyphenation in that usage.

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I'd hyphenate it there. It is, indeed, a reasonably well known phrase. But in usage, as part of a (short) strong of modifiers, the hyphen helps make sure it's clear.

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No hyphen in that usage. 

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I'd use the singular in both cases. 

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I would draw a distinction between the possessive form (victims' rights) and the descriptive form (civil rights).

With the possessive form, I can't see that a singular verb would ever work. (If someone can think of an example to the contrary, do speak up!)

With the descriptive form, treating rights as a collective noun taking a singular verb could work in some uses if rights is regarded as one entity:  Civil rights is the topic of the next lecture. But: Civil rights are important to all people.

Here's some more detail from the collective nouns entry:

PLURAL IN FORM: Some words that are plural in form become collective nouns and take singular verbs when the group or quantity is regarded as a unit.
Right: A thousand bushels is a good yield. (A unit.)
Right: A thousand bushels were created. (Individual items.)
Right: The data is sound. (A unit.)
Right: The data have been carefully collected. (Individual items.)


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No comma in that example.

Here's the relevant section from the comma entry (emphasis added):

WITH CONJUNCTIONS: When a conjunction such as and, but or for links two clauses that could stand alone as separate sentences, use a comma before the conjunction in most cases: She was glad she had looked, for a man was approaching the house.
As a rule of thumb, use a comma if the subject of each clause is expressly stated: We are visiting Washington, and we also plan a side trip to Williamsburg. We visited Washington, and our senator greeted us personally. But no comma when the subject of the two clauses is the same and is not repeated in the second: We are visiting Washington and plan to see the White House.
The comma may be dropped if two clauses with expressly stated subjects are short. In general, however, favor use of a comma unless a particular literary effect is desired or if it would distort the sense of a sentence.

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I'd hyphenate it.

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You are correct: It should be lowercase in such uses. 

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No year is needed if you're talking about the current year. Your first example is correct.

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Putting said or says after the name is more natural. It's the way people speak. Thus, it's our preference for writing. It's OK to put it before the name now and then if it works for the flow of the rest of the sentence. But in general, we put the attribution after the name.

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No hyphen in those uses. Here's the entry:

-ly 

Do not use a hyphen between adverbs ending in -ly and adjectives they modify: an easily remembered rule, a badly damaged island, a fully informed woman.
See the compound modifiers section of the hyphen entry.


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That's a middle-ground one, as you surmise. Those phrases aren't all that complex, and the meaning is clear without a comma. On the other hand, the sentence as a whole has a lot of words and thoughts (not to mention capital letters!) and adding the comma could help in readability. 

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I think your first option is better.

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It's correct the way you've written it. Lowercase.

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The apostrophe is correct in your usage. Here's the rule:

QUASI POSSESSIVES: Follow the rules above in composing the possessive form of words that occur in such phrases as a day's pay, two weeks' vacation, three days' work, your money's worth.

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I'd write out the words in those examples. 

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We're reconsidering our style and haven't reached a conclusion. Thanks for bringing it up.

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No, that was an oversight. We'll fix it. Thanks for noting it.

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I think it's safe to say that usage is evolving and style hasn't been settled yet. From my brief research, it looks like AP writers have managed to avoid those three terms, in any style, which may be the best way to go (especially for cryptocraze or crypto-craze).

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Yes, rewriting would be better. Otherwise it reads as if "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane" belonged to 1962. 

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AP style uses quotation marks for such uses. 

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That's a murky one. You're correct in your reasoning; under the guidelines, hyphens aren't needed, and they're not needed to make the meaning clear.  There's a part of my brain that really wants to hyphenate them anyway, but I don't have a good explanation. So do without the hyphens!

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Under the current guidelines, AP spells out six in that use: In only six years. It's along the lines of the opening to the numerals entry:

In general, spell out one through nine: The Yankees finished second. He had nine months to go.
Use figures for 10 or above and whenever preceding a unit of measure or referring to ages of people, animals, events or things

In that usage, it's not an age. And the philosophy is that it's also not a unit of measure like inch or mile is. 

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I'm not seeing a problem with it, but maybe I'm missing something? 

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In AP stories, we use the term only in quotes and lowercase it. It's not a formal designation. And other entertaining places may differ with the self-assessment.


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