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Last Seven Days

Question from on Dec. 01, 2022

Is it gameboard or game board?

Answer

game board

Question from McLean, Virginia, on Dec. 01, 2022

Should it be Chatham House Rules or Chatham House rules?

Answer

It depends on the usage. Is that the name of a publication (Chatham House Rules), or a general description of rules (Chatham House rules)? Or do you mean the Chatham House rule? Chatham House itself capitalizes Chatham House Rule. AP would lowercase rule.

Answer

We use "1984"

Question from Springfield, Missouri, on Dec. 01, 2022

Is Ethernet capitalized  if it's not the first word in a sentence?

Answer

We use lowercase.

Answer

Technically you'd need to spell it out under our style. You have two choices: Don't follow our style for this one, or rephrase to avoid starting the sentence that way.

Answer

First, do you need to use that as a direct quote? It's not a good quote. It's confusing. Why use it?

If you have to use it: Use single quotation marks within a direct quote: "My favorite book as a child was `Hop on Pop,' and even today I sometimes flip through it," she said.


Answer

Someone hit "delete" by mistake.

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We use lowercase for job descriptions. 

Answer

Here's our bibliography, which provides many but not all sources. As for the Big Three specifically our style was Big Three when General Motors, Ford and Chrysler were the top three automakers in the world. We no longer use the term. 

Answer

Yes. Follow the guidelines in the composition titles entry.

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On first reference to milligrams: 2 milligrams of Xanax. Later references can be abbreviated: 1 mg of Prozac.

Answer

We don't enclose acronyms in parentheses. We say that if it's well known enough or clear enough for readers to understand, then you don't need the parenthetical addition. If it's not clear, then don't use it. Of course, you could choose to do differently.

As for your specific question: No, the full term shouldn't be capitalized just because you later use an acronym. 


Answer

the Broker, Defense Counsel and Risk Management advisory committees

Answer

We recommend being as specific as possible. Some people oppose abortion, but support someone else's right to have an abortion. Other people oppose abortion for anyone. Try to determine the specific views of the person, people or group in question.


Question from Burlington, New Jersey, on Nov. 29, 2022

The hip-hop entry is empty https://www.apstylebook.com/ap_stylebook/hip-hop

Answer

It's not empty; it just doesn't have any content other than the style: hip-hop.

Answer

To succeed in editing, you need to know AP style. I see no reason not to start such a sentence with to. 

Question from Arlington, Virginia, on Nov. 28, 2022

Will AP be changing its use of the term “monkeypox” in light of the new recommendation from WHO to use “mpox” instead? U.S. federal health agencies will apparently be adopting the new term as well.   

Answer

UPDATE with new entry:

mpox 


A virus that originates in wild animals and occasionally jumps to people, who can spread it to others. The virus was previously known as monkeypox, because it was first seen in research monkeys. The World Health Organization changed the name to mpox in November 2022, saying the term monkeypox could be construed as stigmatizing and racist. Until the new name becomes more widely known, use mpox on first reference and mention its former name in one reference later in the story. Mpox is pronounced EM’-pox.

Answer

Well, that is a headache! That discrepancy probably has been in the book for decades and you're the first to notice it. I'll talk it over with my Stylebook colleagues later. For now, I'd say that 5-foot-6 is perfectly clear and is the way to go. Thanks for asking!

Answer

Yes, it's lifelong learner.

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Yes, use the two hyphens.

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For the noun, proof text. That's listed by Merriam-Webster, one of our secondary dictionaries. Our primary dictionary, Webster's New World College Dictionary, doesn't list the term. For the verb, I'd use the hyphen: proof-texting. It's not listed in Merriam-Webster.

Answer

Correct. No hyphens in those. Here's the relevant section of the race-related  coverage entry:

dual heritage No hyphen for terms such as African American, Asian American and Filipino American, used when relevant to refer to an American person’s heritage. The terms are less common when used to describe non-Americans, but may be used when relevant: Turkish German for a German of Turkish descent. For terms denoting dual citizenship, use the hyphen: a dual U.S.-Australian citizen.

Answer

If it's clear that you're talking to more than one person, then one can assume you want the thoughts of each of them (or of any who want to provide thoughts). So: I am curious to learn your thoughts is correct.

Answer

Paddle-wheeler, the style used by Webster's New World College Dictionary.

Answer

Yes, it's fine to abbreviate, as shown here in food guidelines

Nutrition information per serving: 650 calories; 240 calories from fat (37% of total calories); 27 g fat (11 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 265 mg cholesterol; 2,260 mg sodium; 66 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 33 g protein.

But in recipes and elsewhere, spell it out.

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2022 Elections Topical Guide

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