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Last Seven Days

Answer

We'd use including, for all the reasons you suggest.

Question from COLUMBIA, MO on Oct 14, 2017

AP Stylebook sez: "average of — The phrase takes a plural verb in a construction such as: An average of 100 new jobs are created daily."

You sure? Seem like it's the "jobs" that are "created daily", not the "average", making job(s) the verb's subject, so when singular: An average of 1 new job is created daily.

(
'Course, AP promoting this passive voice is a whole 'nother prob.)

And here 'tis with "average" as subject: An average of apples and oranges will prove fruitless, but averages of apples and apples are peachy.




Answer

The rule isn't saying that the phrase "average of" always takes a plural verb, just in certain constructions. Indeed, there are plenty of examples where a singular verb makes more sense, including in your example using one new job. Another example from the average, mean, median, norm entry: The average of 7, 9, 17 is 33 divided by 3, or 11.

Answer

According to Webster's, it's dry-cleaning services. 

Answer

While "L" is a consonant, it sounds like "el" -- a vowel sound.  So use "an."

Answer

That's right: Follow the Stylebook's rules for ordinal numbers. Spell out first through ninth, and use figures starting with 10th.

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Normally, an informal name is not capitalized. On the other hand, local custom has some bearing on this, and conceivably some readers might be confused if you were to change your style -- is "the planning board" something other than "the Planning Board"? Clarity is the imperative.

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The subject here is "a block," which is singular. A block of rooms IS available. 

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It doesn't come up very often -- and there is almost certainly a better way of writing such a sentence -- but your inclination is correct. Use "a," because the sentence would read as if it was "a negative 28 percentage point net approval rating."

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The dictionary spells out the expression without hyphens: day in, day out. In general, try to use the hyphen only in a situation where omitting it would create confusion about the meaning of the sentence. 

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Correct.

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In that example, use the infinitive form: to realize

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Yes. The apostrophe replaces "g," the period comes after it marking the end of the sentence, and the quote comes after the period.

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We consulted our business news editors, and they endorse SCORE -- to be consistent with past practice, and to differentiate it from the common noun score.

Answer

Omit the article in this case -- it would be U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Question from New York on Oct 12, 2017

Hi. Should it be ever-growing or evergrowing? Thanks!

Answer

Evergrowing is not recognized by Merriam-Webster; as a compound modifier, ever-growing would be hyphenated.

Question from Bangalore on Oct 12, 2017

Is it "Northwest Virginia" or "northwest Virginia?"

Answer

The rule is to capitalize regions, but not compass directions. Since northwest Virginia is not widely known as a discrete region -- unlike, for example, Northern Virginia -- it should not be capitalized.

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Use the definite article "the" in most cases when referring to "the public" as the community at large. Your example should read: "The beach is open to the public." According to Webster's, there are two instances where other forms are appropriate: "in public," as in not in secret, and "go public," when a company issues shares for sale to the public.

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Correct as written: three times faster, four times as likely. In general, hyphens should be used only when the joined phrase acts as a modifier and is easily misunderstood without the hyphen. For example: the three-times-weekly memo, though most of those uses can be rephrased to be more easily understood: the memo sent three times a week.

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The hyphenation is correct: the 18- to 44-year-old. 

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It's the former -- set your sights, as in gun sight.

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The sentence is just as easily understood without the comma. In general, you can skip the comma unless omitting it would lead to confusion or misinterpretation. 

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New Year's Eve is all about the arrival of the new year. So the party's title should reflect that: NYE 2018.

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The Stylebook calls for quotes around the titles of books aside from holy or reference books. The same goes for book titles in headlines, but single quotes there.

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Yes. It's an appositive, and it's properly set off by dashes.

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Merriam-Webster and other dictionaries do not recognize handbuilt. We'd stick with hand built, two words.

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