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Last Seven Days

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It's optional. 

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We don't cover this scenario and would recommend rephrasing if at all possible. If you can't rephrase, I think Ali's is the only reasonable solution. Alis is simply confusing. Alies is also confusing. Ali's is at least recognizable. And there's a precedent for the apostrophe in a plural, though it usually applies only to single letters:

SINGLE LETTERS: Use 's: Mind your p's and q's. He learned the three R's and brought home a report card with four A's and two B's. The Oakland A's won the pennant.


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See the below from Webster's New World College Dictionary. It's nuanced, but global implies a longer-standing situation while globalized hints at more action or perhaps an evolving nature.

That said, I'd think the simpler global air travel and industrial supply chains would certainly work.


globalize  vt. -ized, -izing to make global; esp., to organize or establish worldwide


glob•al 

(glō´bəl)

adj.  1 round like a ball; globe-shaped 2 of, relating to, or including the whole earth; worldwide 3 complete or comprehensive 4 being or having to do with a business, operation, system, etc. carried on or extending throughout all or much of the world [a global company, global communications]  5 Comput. pertaining to or including an entire file, database, etc. —glob´ally adv.

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How about John Smith, Ph.D.s

Not ideal, but perhaps the best solution unless you want to keep it singular for this purpose.

Our style includes periods for both: 

Ph.D., Ph.D.s


M.D.


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Thanks for pointing it out. I've deleted the previous references to best-seller. I do go through and clean up as I get the time. Sorry to say that we're not hiring, but I do appreciate the free help ...

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See if this is what you have in mind:
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I'd use the hyphen in this case because of the construction and the need to link the first element with the second. The response in question:

Calling all first- through fifth-graders. Use this guidance from the hyphen entry:

SUSPENSIVE HYPHENATION: Use these forms to shorten a compound modifier or a noun phrase that shares a common word:
When the elements are joined by and or or, expressing more than one element: 10-, 15- or 20-minute intervals; 5- and 6-year-olds. But: The intervals are 10, 15 or 20 minutes; the children are 5 to 6 years old.
When the elements are joined by to or by, expressing a single element: a 10-to-15-year prison term; an 8-by-12-inch pan. But: The prison term is 10 to 15 years; the pan is 8 by 12 inches.

Note that the entry says no hyphen in most cases. Do hyphenate if needed to avoid confusion. The above falls in that realm.


grade, grader 


No hyphen in most cases: a fourth grade student, first grader, she is in the fifth grade. (A change in 2019.) Do hyphenate if needed to avoid confusion, such as when combined with another ordinal number: He was the sixth fourth-grade student to win the prize; she is the 10th third-grader to join.


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The 95%-leased building...

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Yes, that's right.

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I'd write it as you have it:  Zion Williamson's 28 Points Lead Pelicans to Win.

I think this 0ne could be argued either way. Given that, I come down in favor of what sounds more natural to regular readers.


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They gathered for a Valentine’s Day-themed event hosted by Bob.

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Yes. Lowercase in that use, and I'd hyphenate space-age.

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I wouldn't use a hyphen there.

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Yes, that's a construction for which there's not consistency as usage has evolved. I'd make it the coffee maker's hometown ...

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Webster's New World College Dictionary recognizes woodworking as one word, but not screenprinting. But because regular readers likely aren't consulting the dictionary, and the latter word is up for debate, I'd go with screenprinting in this context for consistency with woodworking and logic to readers.


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We don't have a style for that. I'd use lowercase and quote marks: Complete the “country of issuance” field on Form I-9. 

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Yes, all are correct.


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Either is fine.


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Yes, capitalize Highway Patrol in reference to that of a specific state.

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Make it accompany.  To make it less open to question, could you rephrase to ... all of the audio equipment and instruments that accompany ... ?


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I often advise people to pay attention to those little warning bells going off in the back of their heads – and to pay attention to debate among staff members. If some members of your staff see the word as a problem, chances are excellent that at least some readers will feel the same. So you're probably best off to avoid it. It also depends on the context, both of the overall story and of the sentence or paragraph in which you might use jungle. And it could depend on your particular audience.

Both Webster's New World College Dictionary and Merriam-Webster do give their first definition of jungle as being, well, like a rainforest. It's certainly proper to use. Whether it's also potentially problematic is up for debate.



jun•gle 

(juŋ´gəl)

n. [[Hindi jangal, desert forest, jungle < Sans jaṅgala, wasteland, desert]]  1 land in a wet, tropical region, usually with large trees, dense underbrush, and a hot climate 2any confused, tangled growth, collection, etc. 3 a form of electronic dance music originating in England in the early 1990s, that blends elements of hip hop, reggae, techno, and house music, emphasizing fast tempos, heavy, elongated bass beats, and highly syncopated, complicated breakbeats and rhythms ☆ 4 [Old Slang] a hobos' camp ☆ 5 [Slang] a place or situation in which people engage in ruthless competition or in a struggle for survival —jun´gly adj.

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The previous editor was saying it should be hyphenated, and I agree. He was advising  to avoid the cliche. Cliches are always good to avoid. I don't mind this one as much as I mind many other cliches.



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You're correct. If you or a loved one knows anything ...

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I'd make it: Customers feel the support staff values their time. Or:  Customers feel the support staff members value their time. 

Question from Woodstock, IL on Feb. 25, 2020

Should the date be this: May 28 to 31 or this: May 28-31? 

Answer

Either is fine. I prefer the second.

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