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Last Seven Days

Question from Tokyo, on Oct. 15, 2021

Hello!

Chart topper or chart-topper? (Or charttoper???)

Answer

Chart-topper

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I'd rewrite it. If the plural is an option, why not just use it: Inmates have plenty of options ...

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We don't abbreviate it.

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We are fine with hypens for ranges in some uses. But really, we'd prefer to write it out in your example. Also, a nonessential clause construction is better in this case, unless the spider also lays other eggs that don't hatch in seven to 11 days.

 The spider lays 45 to 85 eggs, which hatch in seven to 11 days.

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... 6 feet ...

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We wouldn't use the term, so we don't have a style. In what context would you use it? If you have to use it, I'd hyphenate.

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There's no set guidance on this. For consistency in this particular construction, I'd write pre- and post-operative care, even though we generally don't use a hyphen in preoperative and postoperative.

Question from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on Oct. 13, 2021

Would you hyphenate multi-asset, e.g., a multi-asset portfolio?

Answer

Yes. In truth, that doesn't exactly follow our guidance. But sometimes you have to make exceptions for the sake of clarity to readers. I find it very hard to read and understand multiasset.

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My preference is strongly for the third option.

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We don't have a style for internationally written dates; we use the U.S. style. 

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The Stylebook itself doesn't have an executive order entry. You're seeing the entry by Webster's New World College Dictionary, which you are getting as part of your Stylebook Online subscription. You're correct: We lowercase president in that use. The dictionary is using a different style. No, we never abbreviate executive order.

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I'd use this option: West South Central census division.

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That style was decided years ago and I can't speak to the thinking of the editors at the time. If I put it on the very long list of things to consider, it won't be very high, truth be told ...

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We wouldn't. But you can, if you want. You're already deviating from our headline style by using initial caps for all the words. That's fine, but just FYI.

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I wouldn't use the hyphen.

Question from Santa Clara, California, on Oct. 12, 2021

Is it delicata or Delicata?

Answer

Lowercase for the type of squash.

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Our style is lowercaese: e-bikes. You're welcome to do otherwise if you prefer, of course.

If you're talking specifically about composition titles, the term would be capitalized. Here's the entry.

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Since these are basically made-up terms not commonly used, a hyphen is best for clarity.

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We refer to the specific agency.

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We use the EU when it's a noun. There aren't particular rules, though. It's possible that usage varies by country.

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The president and the AP have different styles on this point. That's often the case, whether it's a president, a company, another media organization or anyone/anything else. Our style remains Indigenous Peoples Day.

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We don't use that style at all. If you prefer to use it, include the commas.

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Yes, that's how we'd do it.

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It's on the list to discuss. Thanks!

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We actually don't have a style for carbon dioxide. In your example, I'd say that if the speaker spoke the full words, then spell it out. If the speaker used the abbreviation, then use that.

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From the Topical Guides

2021 Back-to-School Topical Guide

The Associated Press has compiled a style guide of essential words, phrases and definitions related to the return to classes. Terms are from the AP Stylebook, usage in AP stories and Webster's New...


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